Saudi corporate entities set sights on sun and solar power

Saudi corporate entities set sights on sun and solar power

Commercial Solar, Solar Power, World News
Facing rising energy consumption, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is getting serious about wind and solar power to offset domestic oil use. Corporate entities - reading the political tea leaves - are beginning to see solar power specifically as an actionable hedge against projected rises in energy costs. A most telling recent announcement hit on October 18, 2017, when news broke that the The Saudi Public investment fund (PIF) has established the new energy services company - ‘Super ESCO.’ This new energy services company has been funded a healthy $507M, and is intended to work with the Ministry of Energy, Industry, and Mineral Resources; Ministry of Finance; and the Saudi Energy Efficiency Centre. The goal is to reduce government spending on the energy sector by 2030, as laid out by…
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City of Chicago buying 1.8 billion clean kWh per year, mostly from wind

Solar Power
Despite President Trump’s 'cold feet' about clean, renewable energy, the city of Chicago is poised to do jump in the deep end: the city has concluded plans to join other green American cities by announcing that by 2025, all city buildings will be powered by renewable energy – the equivalent of 300 wind turbines. In January, Mayor Emanuel made it public that Chicago had reduced its carbon emissions by 7% from the year 2010 to 2015. In the city's 2017 budget, they 'allocate $98.6 million for utility expenses, including electricity and natural gas, and $26 million for vehicle fuel costs, including diesel.' In this plan they're going to eventually buy 1.8 billion clean kWh - probably from relatively local wind sources. Noted in the PR document - Collectively the City, CPS, the…
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Monday morning quarterback says – “Who controls TeslaSolar’s data? That’s what really matters!” 

Monday morning quarterback says – “Who controls TeslaSolar’s data? That’s what really matters!” 

Residential, Solar Power, Tesla
I wrote this yesterday. And as I wrote yesterday, and reflected on today, I started to realize the greatest reason Musk needs to own an inverter is because of the data network - not the few hundred million a year. This is the nature of a distributed power company. I'd guess Tesla/SolarCity have had very specific conversations on this topic with any vendors they use - lawyers write mean paragraphs regarding data rights. As TeslaSolar keeps growing, they're going to find more ways to sell their energy and related services. Having immediate access to distributed batfery storage via auto, home, commercial and Utility installations, plus solar generation to sell into active energy markets is worth a lot of money.
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The reality is that your solar system will work for 50 years

Solar Power
Something I wrote elsewhere - the gist of the story is that SolarCity sees that their solar panels last 35 years before they hit the 80% of original output mark that most consider the "useful lifetime." This is significant because the current standard for this useful lifetime is 25 years - adding 10 mores years is a 40% increase in expected output. One of the constant challenges when considering whether to install solar is what the cost of the electricity is - we all know gas, oil and coal are cheap. But what about solar power? Well - we can now low the price per kWh by about 35%.
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Musk makes Magic

Solar Power
Imagine robots creating themselves, powering themselves, designing themselves - now imagine a battery factory, car factory and solar factory feeding each other. Our ecosystem of manufacturing is our body. Our animal is Gaia.
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Massachusetts solar cap hit first day – $671M in projects moving forward, 11 MW stalled

Massachusetts solar cap hit first day – $671M in projects moving forward, 11 MW stalled

Solar Power
The State of Massachusetts recently signed legislation to expand the amount of solar power allowable in the state - and ran out on the first day. This legislation was signed after one area of Massachusetts was unable to install $617 million in solar projects since July of 2015 due to hitting the "net-metering" cap. The legislation doubled the amount of space that was available. On May 11th, the first day that Massachusetts updated its website to reflect this newly available solar installation volume, it was shown that the solar power cap was hit by previously reserved projects. (more…)
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